Solicitor

Solicitor, one of the two types of practicing lawyers in England and Wales—the other being the barrister, who pleads cases before the court. Solicitors carry on most of the office work in law, and, in general, a barrister undertakes no work except through a solicitor, who prepares and delivers the client’s instructions. Solicitors confer with clients, give advice, draft documents, conduct negotiations, prepare cases for trial, and retain barristers for advice on special matters or for advocacy before the higher courts. They have a right to act in all courts as the agents for litigation or representatives of their clients, and they are deemed officers of the court, but they may appear as advocates only in the lower courts. As their activities make up the greater part of the work of lawyers, solicitors are many times more numerous than barristers.
The usual education required of a solicitor includes either a qualifying law degree or both a degree in a different suitable subject and a Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL), awarded by examination. Both are followed by a postgraduate Legal Practice Course, a two-year period of recognized training (also called the training contract), and a Professional Skills Course. In addition, prospective solicitors must pass a test of character and suitability by declaring that they have not engaged in any potentially disqualifying behaviour, such as criminal offenses, unethical professional conduct, or financial mismanagement.
The official representative organization of solicitors was the Law Society, a voluntary group, incorporated by Parliament. The society’s Regulation Board, which had extensive authority in setting and enforcing standards for solicitors, was replaced by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) in 2007. See also Inns of Court.