Attorney

Since 1933, the attorneys of Berchem Moses PC, have been helping individuals, businesses, educational institutions and governmental organizations resolve legal concerns of all types. We can help you, too. Please contact our Milford or Westport, Connecticut, law firm today to discuss your specific concerns.
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England and Wales
The term was also used in England and Wales for lawyers who practised in the common law courts. They were officers of the courts and were under judicial supervision. Solicitors, those lawyers who practised in the courts of equity, were considered to be more respectable than attorneys and by the mid-19th century many attorneys were calling themselves solicitors.[1] In 1873, the Supreme Court of Judicature Act abolished the term «attorney», and attorneys were redesignated solicitors. Attorneys did not generally actually appear as advocates in the higher courts, a role reserved (as it still usually is) for barristers.
In England and Wales, references in any enactment to attorneys must be construed as references to solicitors of the Senior Courts.
Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland
In both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, various pre-partition statutes dealing with the whole of Ireland and governing court structures, procedures, and court officers remain in force, such as the Supreme Court of Judicature Act (Ireland) 1877.
References in any statutory provision in force in Northern Ireland to attorneys must be construed as references to solicitors of the Court of Judicature.
In the Republic of Ireland, references in any enactment to an attorney (or proctor) are to be construed as a reference to a solicitor.