Car insurance cost

ValuePenguin researched and crunched the numbers to get you the average cost of car insurance by state. Use our data to see what your states average premiums are to get a better idea of what you should be paying for insurance.

To jump directly to the average cost for different types of insurance, click on the links below:

Car Insurance
Car Insurance Rates: By Age
Car Insurance Rates: By Gender
Homeowners Insurance
Renters Insurance
Health Insurance
Pet Insurance
Average Cost of Car Insurance
The average annual cost of car insurance paid in the United States was $907.38 in 2014 according to a study commissioned by Quadrant Information Services. This figure will vary wildly state to state and does not always include all forms of coverage and may not be accurately reflect your coverage needs. Scroll through the table below to find the average cost of car insurance in your state or use the form to find a cheaper quote for auto insurance:
Find the Cheapest Auto Insurance Quotes in Your Area

Zip Code
Currently Insured?Find Insurers
Data from various states’ Departments of Insurance show that annual car insurance premiums are on the rise in the majority of states across the nation. The average cost of insurance for car owners of insuring their vehicles from accidents and other events has generally increased, with the exceptions of Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia, who all saw their car insurance premiums drop between 1% and 5% in the last year. These quotes for automobile insurance in select states across the country should give you a ballpark estimate for average annual car insurance.

Car Insurance Rates by Age
Auto insurance quotes will vary significantly depending on the age of the driver or applicant. Young drivers are notoriously more dangerous behind the wheel and because of that, insurance companies charge higher rates on policies covering young drivers. The chart below will show you how drastically car insurance quotes fluctuate based on your age. Each dollar amount in the graph below represents the average annual cost at that age.

Graph of car insurance rates by age
If you’re interested in reading more about how your age affects your car insurance rates check out our full analysis here.

Car Insurance Rates by Gender
Amongst those drivers that have had no violations or accidents within the past 3 years, auto insurance rates are fairly similar with the exception of young drivers. Our data, which looked at rates from 54 different insurance companies, showed that 19 year old male drivers paid an average of 12% more in car insurance premiums each year over their female counterparts. Why is this the case? While gender is not a direct ratings factor that insurance companies look at, the data behind the gender shows that men tend to drive more often, receive more speeding tickets, be involved in more accidents, and receive more DUI convictions than women!
Home insurance is designed to cover homeowners in the event of any unforeseen catastrophe that damages their home. The average cost of home insurance will be influenced primarily by the location of your residential property and the extent of your insurance coverage. Several types of home insurance are common or typical to specific regions or locales, such as damage to floodwaters, hurricanes, earthquakes, etc. As a general rule, the Federal Reserve Bureau says you can estimate the expense of homeowners insurance by dividing the value of your home by 1,000 and then multiplying that number by $3.50. Using average home price data from AARP, here are some typical annual homeowners insurance prices from around the country, ValuePenguin has constructed a table for your reference.
If you’re one of the millions of Americans who have forgone buying a house in exchange for renting a place, you may want to consider renters insurance as a way to protect your personal belongings. Renters insurance protects your studio, walk-up apartment, or elevator apartment against events such as destruction of property from fire, vandalism, and theft. Looking at some of the average costs of renters insurance in our four representative states, ValuePenguin thinks the monthly premium is cheap enough and worth the peace of mind knowing you can at least recover the cost of any lost or damaged items.
Health insurance is an important investment to make in oneself, family members, and loved ones. According to the Department of Health and Human Services’ 2017 Annual Insurance Survey, the average monthly premium for individuals in the United States was $476 (or $5,712 per year). Between 2013 and 2017, average premiums increased 105% for individual policies. These figures include rates from all 39 Healthcare.gov states.

The average cost of health insurance ranges between $319 in Utah and $1,041 in Alaska. ValuePenguin’s table has a few examples of average annual premiums for individuals in select states to give you an idea of the average cost of health insurance. For a full treatment of the average cost of health insurance see our in depth article.

Average Cost of Pet Insurance
Insurance companies providing pet health coverage factor in the breed of your pet when determining quotes for your premium. In a 2017 survey of the market, ValuePenguin found that on average, medical insurance prices for the most popular breeds of pooches varied by over 18%, and rates for the most popular cat breeds varied by over 62%.
The below table shows the estimated monthly cost of pet insurance for the most popular breeds of cat, averaged across the expected monthly premiums of the different plans at several major pet insurance providers. To compare across different insurance policies for your pet, use ValuePenguin’s pet insurance comparison tool here.
For ballpark estimates on your car insurance rates, or to find out how, why or how much your car insurance will go up or down after a ticket or a change of address, we have several helpful articles and car insurance calculators.

CarInsurance.com’s average car insurance rates tool provides average auto insurance rates for nearly every ZIP code in the U.S. It allows motorists to explore comparative rates within their own city or across the nation.
The «How much car insurance do I need?» tool can suggest what level of coverage is best for you, based on your age, the state you live in, your car’s model year, whether you own or finance your car, and whether you own or rent your home.

By their nature, averages and estimates don’t apply specifically to you. For that, you can use our online quote comparison tool and get matched with multiple car insurance providers, who will give you a quote, or you can call one of our licensed insurance agents at 855-430-7753.

But you may simply be looking ahead to a new car, a marriage or a move across town and wonder about the consequences. We advise that you check car insurance rate quotes before making life changes, so you’ll be aware of how your premium may change and can budget for it appropriately, or switch to a provider that offers a better price given your new situation.

Below are answers to some of the most common questions about the factors affecting your car insurance rate.

How much does my age affect my car insurance rates?
Auto insurers penalize inexperience rather than age. Of course, the vast majority of inexperienced drivers are teenagers. Rates for 16-year-olds can double or even triple their parents’ car insurance annual premiums.

The less experienced the driver, the higher the rates. Among drivers with clean records and no accidents, no other factor changes rates more.

Statistically, inexperienced drivers crash – a lot – and so they are the riskiest category of drivers to insure. Car insurance rates reflect this high risk.

The inexperience penalty drops slowly until about year 10. As an example, this is what the inexperience surcharge for basic bodily injury liability coverage looks like at one California car insurer during the first decade of driving:
If you keep a clean record after age 25, rates typically stay relatively stable until you become a senior driver, when crash rates go up and premiums begin to rise again.

Does my address affect what I pay for insurance?
If you live in a highly populated urban area, congestion, accidents and insurance claims are more prevalent. Living and driving in a metro area will make your rates higher than if you live in a rural area, where having an auto accident is less likely.

Car insurance companies look at factors such as the rate of stolen cars in your area, and the number of cases of vandalism, claims and fraudulent claims. All of this helps insurers discern the risk associated with insuring you and your car in that ZIP code, whether you ever have made a claim or not.

All other factors equal, your ZIP code can change your rate by hundreds of dollars.

Are some cars cheaper to insure than others? Why?
Auto insurers track which cars have the most wrecks and the worst injury records. Those factors impact the cost you pay for liability insurance — which covers the damage you cause to others.

Insurers also know which cars are expensive to buy, expensive to repair or more easily stolen. Those factors drive up the cost of collision and comprehensive coverage, which repairs or replaces your own car.

The calculations about the risk of a certain car are made independently. For example, if you are an inexperienced driver in a car with a poor claims record, you are penalized twice. A more mature driver in the same car would pay a surcharge for the car, but not one for inexperience.

Insurers can also choose not to cover certain types or brands of cars. For example, some won’t insure a lifted pickup truck, a kit car or certain exotic cars.

How does my marital status affect my car insurance rate?
Married couples have been found to have fewer accidents and claims than single drivers do.

Rates can be from 5 percent to 15 percent lower for married couples just because of their marital status. But there are also other discounts married couples can look forward to when they combine their policies, such as a multicar discount, or a multipolicy discount if they have a renters or homeowners policy with the same insurer.

An insurer considers you single if you have never been married, or are widowed or divorced.

How much does my driving record impact my car insurance rate?
Your driving record is paramount to your car insurance company. Safe drivers get a discount from standard rates for keeping a clean driving record. On the flip side, individuals who have a moving violation (speeding or a DUI, for example) or an accident on their motor vehicle record are more of a risk and can face a surcharge on top of standard rates.

If you have enough violations or accidents, you can become uninsurable according to some car insurance companies’ underwriting rules. For example, some insurers reject anyone with four or more chargeable accidents in three years, or more than three DUIs in seven years, or more than 15 points on the driver’s motor vehicle record.

In general, a minor violation such as a speeding ticket can boost your rates 20 percent to 40 percent. You may not be surcharged for the actual ticket, but will lose your good-driver discount. If you have a major violation like a DUI, your rates can go up 100 percent or more. The more risk you appear to be to your auto insurer, the more you will pay.

How much does my commute matter?
You car’s annual mileage is a rating factor for many car insurance companies. The less you drive, the less risk you have of being in an accident. Also, how far you drive for your commute lets the insurer know what kind of risk you are during the congested, high-risk hours.

Your insurer can also use the length of your commute to determine if you head into a metro area from your rural or suburban home. If you live outside of Los Angeles, but your commute is 30 miles, your insurer can predict that although your local area is low-risk, your commute into the heart of a very populated metropolitan area pushes your risk factor much higher.

Why should my credit history count?
Insurance companies routinely check your credit rating as part of your application process, except in California, Massachusetts and Hawaii, where state law prohibits credit from being a pricing factor.

Credit scores help the insurance companies assess the risk level of a potential customer. Research has shown that those with lower credit scores (typically under 600) are more likely to file claims, file exaggerated claims, or even commit insurance fraud.

Those with low scores may face a surcharge. Rates for those with higher scores are typically unaffected.

Your credit score can also affect how an insurance company allows you to pay for your policy, since statistics show that people with lower credit scores are more likely to miss a payment. Customers with very poor credit scores may be required to pay the entire premium for a six-month policy up front. Customers with low credit scores sometimes won’t qualify for monthly billing, or they may need to pay a large percentage of the policy up front and the remainder monthly.

Are some types of coverage more expensive?
There are several types of car insurance. The more coverage you get, the more you will pay. If you get a bare-bones liability policy that covers only what the state requires, your car insurance costs are going to be less than if you bought coverage that would repair your own car, too.

Liability coverage tends to cost more because the amount the insurance company risks is higher. Coverage for collision and comprehensive insurance is limited by the replacement cost of the car itself. But medical bills and multiple-car accidents could push a liability claim into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

If you don’t have enough liability coverage, you could be sued for the difference by anyone you injure.

Comprehensive and collision damage is affected by the deductible you choose. The higher the deductible, the less the insurance company will have to pay — and the lower your rates.

Medical coverage, such as uninsured motorist bodily injury, medical payments or personal injury protection (PIP), will cause your rates to go up. Without some kind of medical coverage, if you don’t have health insurance elsewhere, you might not be able to pay for treatment if you are injured in an accident you caused.

Is there any difference between insurance companies?
Insurance companies must follow state laws, but within those laws they price coverage based on their own underwriting rules and guidelines. One insurance company may look at your driving record for five years, another only for three. The surcharge for a speeding ticket may raise your insurance by 10 percent with one carrier but only 5 percent with another.

You should shop around and get quotes from several carriers. Make sure you are comparing apples to apples — the same coverages with each insurer — and check the reliability and financial stability of the insurance carrier.

Finally, make an informed decision about who you want to be insured with for the best price and protection. Don’t let a small savings drive you away from an insurance company you know and trust.